NBC just called OHIO for Obama, putting him over the top.

You’re welcome, America.

As we left the Oval Office, executive editor Eric Bates told Obama that he had asked his six-year-old if there was anything she wanted him to say to the president. … [S]he said, ‘Tell him: You can do it.’ Obama grinned. … ‘You know, kids have good instincts,’ Obama offered. ‘They look at the other guy and say, “Well, that’s a bullshitter, I can tell.”

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Obama To Rolling Stone On What Kids Think Of Romney: ‘That’s A Bulls****er, I Can Tell’ | Mediaite

I believe the children are our future set them free and let the lead the way.

(via zainyk)

(via newsweek)

Eternal emergency.

This is why the “disillusioned Obama voter” is a real thing that understandably rightfully exists. BECAUSE THIS SHIT IS GODDAMNED RIDICULOUS.

Listen, I’m glad I have a president who supports marriage equality and expanding healthcare coverage and a woman’s right to choose and even “the redistribution of wealth.” But I wish he wasn’t the same guy who failed to chose not to close Guantanamo and who expands domestic surveillance across the board and kills American citizens overseas with drones and re-ups on an eleven year old state of emergency.

I voted for him once, and I’ll do so again, because I believe there is a definite, clear choice when it comes to the social and economic issues we face as a nation. But let’s not kid ourselves — party lines have gotten pretty blurry when it comes to the war on terror and “matters of national security.” And increasingly, it seems as though even hoping for change on these issues has become a long shot.

(via newsweek)

Eternal emergency.

This is why the “disillusioned Obama voter” is a real thing that understandably rightfully exists. BECAUSE THIS SHIT IS GODDAMNED RIDICULOUS.

Listen, I’m glad I have a president who supports marriage equality and expanding healthcare coverage and a woman’s right to choose and even “the redistribution of wealth.” But I wish he wasn’t the same guy who failed to chose not to close Guantanamo and who expands domestic surveillance across the board and kills American citizens overseas with drones and re-ups on an eleven year old state of emergency.

I voted for him once, and I’ll do so again, because I believe there is a definite, clear choice when it comes to the social and economic issues we face as a nation. But let’s not kid ourselves — party lines have gotten pretty blurry when it comes to the war on terror and “matters of national security.” And increasingly, it seems as though even hoping for change on these issues has become a long shot.

thedailyshow:

Modern politics is a science. We break it down for you.

thedailyshow:

Modern politics is a science. We break it down for you.

It’s got to be Omar, right? I mean, that guy is unbelievable, right?

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Barack Obama, when asked who he thought was the best character on The Wire


In a conference call that started at 9:45 a.m Friday morning, White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett briefed a large number of women’s health groups about the administration’s proposed changes to the so-called contraception rule. Under the new language, Jarrett, said, religious institutions would still be required to cover contraception as part of any health care plan they offer to their employees. But they also will be offered a veritable opt-out clause. If they determine that the requirement violates their religious sensibilities, the burden would then fall on the insurance company to cover the cost. That insurance company would be required to inform the recipient of their benefits package in addition to paying for the contraception. This, explained Jarrett, effectively removes religious institutions from any role in the process (it’s the White House’s hope that this mutes the criticism). Insurers will be fine picking up the slack, she added, because the cost saved in covering contraception outweighs the expenses made in covering procedures that result from not having contraception available.

- Obama Birth Control Compromise In Works

The reason 2012 feels so empty now is that voters on both sides of the aisle are not just tired of this state of affairs, they are disgusted by it. They want a chance to choose their own leaders and they want full control over policy, not just a partial say. There are a few challenges to this state of affairs within the electoral process – as much as I disagree with Paul about many things, I do think his campaign is a real outlet for these complaints – but everyone knows that in the end, once the primaries are finished, we’re going to be left with one 1%-approved stooge taking on another.


Most likely, it’ll be Mitt Romney versus Barack Obama, meaning the voters’ choices in the midst of a massive global economic crisis brought on in large part by corruption in the financial services industry will be a private equity parasite who has been a lifelong champion of the Gordon Gekko Greed-is-Good ethos (Romney), versus a paper progressive who in 2008 took, by himself, more money from Wall Street than any two previous presidential candidates, and in the four years since has showered Wall Street with bailouts while failing to push even one successful corruption prosecution (Obama).

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Matt Taibbi

Continued from the same post:

This widespread and growing movement against the twin corrupting influences of money on our politics and state patronage on big business is going on everywhere – on the streets, in these courthouses, in the homes of people refusing to move after foreclosure, even in the antitax movements and the campaigns against state pensions. The only place we can be absolutely sure this battle will not be found is in any national presidential race between Barack Obama and someone like Mitt Romney.

The campaign is still a gigantic ritual and it will still be attended by all the usual pomp and spectacle, but it’s empty. In fact, because it’s really a contest between 1%-approved candidates, it’s worse than empty – it’s obnoxious.

It was always annoying when these two parties and the slavish media that follows their champions around for 18 months pretended that this was a colossal clash of opposites. But now, with the economy in the shape that it’s in thanks in large part to the people financing these elections, that pretense is more than annoying, it’s offensive.

And I imagine that the more they try to play up the drama of these familiar-but-empty campaign rituals, the more irritating to the public it will all become. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if, before the season is out, the campaign itself will become a hated symbol of the 1% — with the conventions and the networks’ broadcast tents outside the inevitable “free speech zones” attracting protests the same way the offices of Chase and Bank of America did this fall.

The problem with companies like Lehman [Brothers] and Enron is that their executives always think they can paper over illegalities by committing more crimes, when in fact all they’re usually doing is snowballing the problem so completely out of control that there’s no longer any chance of fixing things, thereby killing the only chance for survival they ever had. This is exactly what Obama and Geithner are doing now. By continually lying about the extent of the country’s corruption problems, they’re adding fraud to fraud and raising such a great bonfire of lies that they probably won’t ever be able to fix the underlying mess. If they looked at the world like public servants, and not like corporate executives, they’d understand that the only way out is to come clean. That they don’t look at things that way should tell people quite a lot.

- Matt Taibbi

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said on Sunday that an agency established to protect consumers from financial fraud “is something out of the Stalinist era.” Graham, speaking on NBC’s “Meet The Press,” was asked why Senate Republicans had filibustered President Obama’s nominee to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was created as part of 2010’s Wall Street reform. Graham spoke as if the bureau had yet to be created and debate was over how to shape it, rather than discussing the nominee, Richard Cordray, the former attorney general in Ohio. “This consumer bureau that they want to propose is under the Federal Reserve, no appropriation oversight, no board. It is something out of the Stalinist era,” Graham said.

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Lindsey Graham: Consumer Protection Bureau ‘Is Something Out Of The Stalinist Era’

In which the “dependably unlikeable" Graham compares the bureau created to protect American consumers from predatory banks to a dictator who murdered millions.

Gov. John Kasich’s fellow Republican governors view him as an asset, and not a liability, to help a yet-to-be-determined GOP challenger defeat President Barack Obama next year. An emerging premise at the Republican Governors Association annual conference yesterday at the Waldorf Astoria here was that the GOP heads of state should contrast their “bold” leadership styles with that of Obama, who New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie called a “bystander in the Oval Office.” Among the Republican governors cited as an example by Christie and others was Kasich, who Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell said was “probably the most reform-minded governor in Ohio in the last 50 years.” A panel of association leaders — McDonnell, chairman; Christie, vice chairman; South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley; and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker — said Kasich served as an appropriate contrast to Obama, even though one of Kasich’s chief initiatives, Senate Bill 5, was overturned by 22 points in a referendum this month.

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Kasich seen as Republican model in 2012 | The Columbus Dispatch

FYI:

Kasich campaigned hard to defend the limits placed on collective bargaining for public employees by Senate Bill 5. Despite his efforts, the bill was defeated 61 percent to 39 percent through Issue 2 on Nov. 8, and Kasich’s most recent approval rating in the state was below 40 percent.

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